Korea Travel EP.2 STREET FOOD, SOUTH KOREA

Korea Travel EP.2 STREET FOOD, SOUTH KOREA

posted in: blog, Korea Travel, travel | 2

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What should you do when you visit South Korea? If you consider eating street food to be a pure joy in life, you are in for a treat in South Korea.

 

Kwangjang market is the mecca of street food, the oldest market in South Korea, which opened in 1905.

The first market in South Korea  is full of action, street vendors, and endless stalls. It has everything from mayak kimbap OR “cocaine” kimbap – so good you’ll be hooked!, to famous mung-bean pancakes. Locals and tourists come to the market to experience the daily hustle and bustle of Seoul, Korea.

 

This traditional market is known for fabric shopping during the day. But, at night it transforms into a meok-ja-gol-mok , which translates to “eating alley”.  Kwan-jang Market comes to life with hundreds of food stalls and street food vendors.

 

One of the best ways to enjoy the market is to graze your way around, sampling mouth watering opportunities as they present themselves. The smell, the sound, and the look of the food is dazzling and you will be one happy clam in this food heaven.

 

Savory, Korean pancakes are common dishes on the street, ranging from kimchi pancakes to chive pancakes

Kwang-jang market is known for mung-bean pancakes, called nok-du-bin-dae-ddeok. These  savory pancakes are made with ground mung beans, some vegetables, and meat bites. We decided to try one with seafood. It was soft and nutty on the inside, but nice and crunchy on the outside. It’s a must try when you visit Kwang-jang market.  

 

Then we moved on to our next feast. Korean fermented rice wine, called mak-geol-li is the perfect companion for grub at the market. These spicy chicken feet, Korean blood sausage and pork head were just right for anju. Anju means side dish for drinking. Virtually, Koreans always eat anju when drinking.

 

With a full belly, we decided to roam around a nearby attraction, dong-dae-design-plaza. It used to be a sports stadium but has been recently turned into a stunning architectural space.

 

It was another wonderful day in Seoul Korea with amazing street food and scenery.

 

The Holiday season is here. If you are looking for a holiday gift idea, consider my ebook, “Hungry Gopher’s Simple Korean Cooking”, It will make the  perfect gift for food lovers and home cooks alike. Get a copy for yourself or for your family members so they can experience delicious, healthy Korean food.

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Happy holiday season, everybody!

 

Hungry Gopher

 

In this episode, you’ll find:

 

 

Thanks for watching!

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2 Responses

  1. That video made me hungry! Keep’em coming! Korean blood sausage…. what American food comes close in taste for this delicacy? I’ve never had any of that in the countries that I’ve traveled, which they have their own, but I was too chicken to tried! Anyhoo, thanks for sharing, and congrats on your e-book!
    Mutt47

  2. Thanks for the great comment, Mutt47! I appreciate it very much. I can’t really think of anything close to Korean blood sausage. You are right on the money that it is a Korean version of sausage.

    I know how unfamiliar food can seem intimidating. Trying blue cheese and arugula totally throw me off when I tried them first. Of course, now I can’t have enough of =)

    Next time when you travel overseas, try some food that’s more adventurous. Perhaps blood sausage in Korea?! The flavor might give you the sensation you’ve never experienced.

    Cheers,

    HG